What Are Blueprints Called Now?

What are blueprints called?

The term blueprint continues to be used less formally to refer to any floor plan (and even less formally, any type of plan).

Practicing engineers, architects, and drafters just call them “drawings” or “prints”..

Why do they call them blueprints?

They were easier to read and faster to make. The process was simple, the machines were not overly expensive for reprographic companies and didn’t need extensive maintenance. For decades, bluelines were the way to make copies of architectural drawings. To this day, they are often called blueprints.

Who invented blueprints?

John Herschel, son of astronomer William Herschel, invented blueprinting in 1842. He too was a great astronomer. He was a mathematician, chemist, and inventor as well. Herschel was the first Englishman to take up photography.

Why are blueprints on blue paper?

Why? It’s because of how those documents are made. The blueprinting process was developed in the mid-1800s, when scientists discovered that ammonium iron citrate and potassium ferrocyanide created a photosensitive solution that could be used for reproducing documents.

Why are blueprints so important?

A blueprint enables you to design with the big picture in mind. In this way, you can ensure you reach every milestone and build consistency throughout the curriculum — even when faced with uncertainty in the project.

Are blueprints still blue?

And, by the 1980s, the architecture, engineering and construction industries were making the move from hand-drawing to computer-aided design (CAD) that could be printed on large-scale paper. Today, “blueprints” aren’t really blue. They are usually black or gray lines on a white background [source: Soniak].